Cancer Drugs and vaccines

Cancer Drugs are used for treating cancer and relieving symptoms of the cancer (e.g. pain), and side-effects, such as nausea. Doctors treat cancer with two or more chemotherapy drugs and sometimes with other medicines, such as steroids or biological therapies. Anti-cancer drugs eradicate cancer cells by stopping growth or multiplication at some point in their life cycles. Vaccines are medicines that enhance the immune system's natural ability to protect the body against “foreign invaders,” mainly infectious agents, that may cause disease. HPV vaccine and Hepatitis B vaccine are cancer prevention vaccines approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Cancer treatment vaccines are called therapeutic vaccines, which increase the ability of immune system to recognize and destroy the antigens.